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Article
February 1928

THE INFLUENCE OF ALKALIS ON THE SECRETION AND COMPOSITION OF GASTRIC JUICE: III. THE EFFECT OF SODIUM BICARBONATE ON THE GASTRIC RESPONSE TO HISTAMINE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Loyola University School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(2):244-248. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130140106007
Abstract

Various writers have stated that the antacid effect of sodium bicarbonate depends not only on the direct neutralization of hydrochloric acid, but also on a reduction of the amount of acid secreted in the stomach. For massive doses of the salt, this depression of gastric secretion was confirmed in some previously published experiments of mine.1 The minimum amount of bicarbonate which could be depended on to produce this effect, however, was found to be about 1 Gm. per kilogram of body weight, whether given as a single dose after a meal, or as the total daily dose for dogs on prolonged feeding with alkali. With smaller doses of bicarbonate, within the limits of ordinary antacid medication, the secretory response to a meal was on the average slightly greater than that found in the control experiments.

If the human stomach is as little affected by alkalis as is that of the

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