[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.171.146.16. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1928

THE ANTAGONISM BETWEEN INSULIN AND PITUITARY EXTRACT: ITS DEMONSTRATION IN A PATIENT WITH ACROMEGALY

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology, Boston University School of Medicine BOSTON

From the Evans Memorial for Clinical Research and Preventive Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1928;41(6):875-882. doi:10.1001/archinte.1928.00130180108007
Abstract

The pituitary body has for a long time been known to play a part in the mechanism that controls carbohydrate metabolism. Goetsch, Cushing and Jacobson1 noted the high carbohydrate tolerance that accompanies pituitary deficiency, and they confirmed Borchardt's2 previous assertion that the injection of pituitary extract caused hyperglycemia.

Stenström3 made the apparently conflicting observation that pituitary extract inhibited the hyperglycemia and glycosuria caused by injections of epinephrine hydrochloride. This was afterward confirmed by Burn4 who was led thereby to speculate that pituitary extract should enhance the action of insulin. He found the opposite to be true,5 namely, that posterior lobe extract, when injected into rabbits simultaneously with insulin, "had a powerful antagonistic effect on the action of insulin" as well as on that of epinephrine hydrochloride.

Olmstead and Logan,6 in their work with decerebrated cats, reached the same conclusion, and the studies of Joachimoglu and Metz,7 Laura,8 and others added

×