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Article
February 1929

CULTURAL AND SEROLOGIC REACTIONS WITH GREENPRODUCING MICROCOCCI FROM MEASLES

Author Affiliations

DETROIT

From the Medical Research Laboratories, Parke, Davis and Company.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;43(2):274-294. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00130250132010
Abstract

During the past few years several papers have appeared with definite detailed descriptions of green-producing micrococci, obtained from measles, which were considered more or less closely associated with the etiology of the disease. From these original descriptions, it is apparent that the organisms differ from one another in many respects, although the impression has been given and the statement made by several writers that they are similar.

The present study was undertaken in an attempt to arrive at some definite conclusion, if possible, in regard to the relationship of these organisms to one another, and to determine, if they differ, wherein their fundamental differences lie, for the ultimate purpose of determining their relationship to measles.

The first mention of a green-producing micrococcus found frequently associated with measles was in 1917, by Tunnicliff.1 This organism was described by the author as a green-producing diplococcus that was isolated from the blood, throat

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