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Article
March 1929

PANCREATIC FUNCTION: III. THE PANCREATIC SECRETION IN DISTURBED GASTRIC SECRETION

Author Affiliations

TOKYO, JAPAN

From the medical clinic of Prof. R. Inada, Imperial University of Tokyo.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;43(3):413-419. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00130260116010
Abstract

Since the investigations of Pavlov and his associates1 in 1878, the mechanism of the pancreatic secretion has become of general interest. Pavlov reported that the pancreatic secretion is promoted by the entrance of the acid chyme into the duodenum, and not by the presence of that in the stomach. This stimulation of the secretion depends largely on the acidity of the chyme, for if a solution of 0.4 per cent hydrochloric acid is introduced into the stomach and rapidly discharged into the duodenum, a copious secretion of the pancreatic juice follows.

Popielski2 and, independently, Wertheimer and Lepage3 proved that even when all the secretory nerves of the pancreas are severed, the pancreatic secretion is promoted by acid. Popielski attributed this to a reflex, the center of which lies in the pancreas.

The classic experiments of Bayliss and Starling4 showed in a striking way that in the action of dilute acid

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