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Article
May 1929

THE BACTERIOLOGY OF THE BLOOD AND JOINTS IN CHRONIC INFECTIOUS ARTHRITIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;43(5):571-605. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00130280002001
Abstract

This study deals with the etiology of a form of chronic arthritis which has been variously referred to as rheumatoid arthritis, arthritis deformans or chronic infectious arthritis. Goldthwaite1 and his school call it atrophic arthritis. It may be defined as a chronic inflammatory condition of the joints and periarticular tissues, characterized in the earlier stages by migratory swelling and stiffness of the joints, and in the later stages by more or less deformity and ankylosis. In the great majority of cases, several joints are involved; indeed, one of the most striking features of the disease is its tendency, if unchecked, to progress and finally to involve nearly every joint in the body.

The etiology of chronic deforming arthritis has long been a subject for debate. Perhaps no disease in the whole realm of internal medicine has been more prolific of hypotheses and theories. It has long been recognized that there

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