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Article
May 1929

CUTANEOUS AND VENOUS BLOOD SUGAR CURVES: II. IN BENIGN GLYCOSURIA AND IN DIABETES

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;43(5):633-652. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00130280064004
Abstract

As early as 1856, Chauveau1 reported that there was more dextrose in arterial than in venous blood. Although his observations were known to Bang2 and have been amply confirmed by subsequent investigators,3 their implications have been almost entirely overlooked by most clinical observers, especially in this country.

It has been definitely established by Hagedorn,4 Foster5 and others that in the normal person in the postabsorptive state arterial (or cutaneous6) and venous blood differ little, if at all, in their sugar content. After a meal containing carbohydrate, however, the sugar curve of the arterial blood rises more than that of the venous blood. A definite positive arterial-venous difference is established. This difference is the most direct evidence that the tissues are actively removing dextrose from the blood and that this process of removal is rapid enough to be easily measurable.

In an earlier communication,7 we described a procedure for the determination

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