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Article
July 1929

OPIUM ADDICTION: VI. THE EFFECTS OF ABRUPT WITHDRAWAL FOLLOWED BY READMINISTRATION OF MORPHINE IN HUMAN ADDICTS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE COMPOSITION OF THE BLOOD, THE CIRCULATION AND THE METABOLISM

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Narcotic Wards of the Philadelphia General Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(1):1-16. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140010004001
Abstract

Continuing our studies on a series of male opium addicts, we wish to report the results obtained when the morphine administered to supply the patients' needs was abruptly withdrawn. These results include studies made at three hour intervals for a twenty-four hour period following the last administration of morphine and another series of results obtained when the drug had been stopped for forty-eight hours. Following the studies at the close of the forty-eight hour period, morphine was again administered to allay all suffering and again the same observations and studies were made.

EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE  Two separate methods of approach were used in the study of changes brought about by the abrupt withdrawal of morphine which was being administered to supply the addict's need. One group was studied at intervals of three hours following the last administration of the drug; in four cases the studies were carried over a period of

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