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Article
August 1929

THE PNEUMOTACHOGRAPH IN CERTAIN INTRATHORACIC DISEASES: ITS DIAGNOSTIC VALUE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory of the Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and the Department of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Germany.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(2):289-300. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140020137012
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  The close functional and anatomic relationship between the heart and lungs is well recognized. Disturbance in the normal functions of the lungs may have considerable importance in diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Occasionally, respiratory changes are the first recognizable signs of circulatory failure. It is partly for this reason that, in the past, the respiration has been studied carefully with the aid of a number of technical devices. The excursions of various parts of the thoracic wall have been registered. Similarly, volumetric measurements of the ventilation have received careful consideration. Through the earlier investigations of Bergeon and Kastus,1 Rosenthal,2 Gad,3 Ewald4 and Gevers-Leuven,5 and through the more recent studies of Pech6 and Beyne,7 it has become an established fact that the velocity of the respired air is also of considerable importance in the mechanism of the respiration. Recently, Fleisch8 described an apparatus which registers the velocity curve

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