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Article
September 1929

THE EFFECT OF UNCOOKED STARCHES ON THE BLOOD SUGAR OF NORMAL AND OF DIABETIC SUBJECTS. II.

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

From George Washington University Hospital and the Hygienic Laboratory.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(3):344-350. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140030043004
Abstract

In previous work,1 raw starch was administered by mouth to rabbits as a means of studying pancreatic function and upper intestinal digestion. In these animals, a rise in blood sugar was uniformly produced; the average rise in the rabbits amounted to 62 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters. This elevation of blood sugar is dependent on the liberation of dextrose from the starch molecule, and the hyperglycemia was shown to afford a means of estimating the activity of pancreatic diastase, on the one hand, and under conditions in which diastatic ferments are normally present, a means of studying other factors which influence the rate of digestion of starch in the alimentary canal.

Approximately 5 Gm. of starch per kilogram of body weight was used in rabbits. Three tests were performed on dogs to which 2 Gm. of starch per kilogram of body weight was given. With this quantity, rises in blood

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