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Article
September 1929

THE AMINO-ACID CONTENT OF THE BLOOD IN HEALTH AND IN DISEASE

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Biochemical Laboratory of Mercy Hospital and the Department of Biological Chemistry of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(3):351-361. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140030050005
Abstract

Among the numerous constituents of the blood stream few are more closely related to many of the fundamental processes of life than the amino-acids. Yet it was only within comparatively recent times (1913) that crystalline amino-acids1 were actually isolated from the blood stream, and considerable confusion still seems to exist in regard to the amount of amino-acid nitrogen in normal and pathologic blood. Thus in a recent text on biochemistry2 the statement is found that "in diabetes mellitus there is an accumulation of amino-acids in the blood and a corresponding increased excretion into the urine. Again in nephritis there is an accumulation of amino-acids in the blood." On another page of the same book one finds the statement that "amino-nitrogen rarely rises in the blood. Even during severe nephritis there is no characteristic increase in amino-nitrogen." In a recent book on blood chemistry,3 the author said that "a definite rise

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