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Article
October 1929

BLOOD SUGAR REGULATION IN IDIOPATHIC STEATORRHEA: II. THE ORIGIN OF THE LOW BLOOD SUGAR CURVE

Author Affiliations

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

From the Medical Department of St. Elizabeth's Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(4):477-485. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140040015002
Abstract

In a preceding paper1 the "low blood sugar curve" was defined as a curve with a rise of only 40 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters or less after the ingestion of about 60 Gm. of dextrose, provided that the determination was made by Hagedorn and Norman-Jensen's method and that the blood was drawn at intervals of from ten to fifteen minutes. Further, it was pointed out that the low blood sugar curve occurred frequently in the idiopathic steatorrheas, and its clinical significance was discussed. In this paper, I shall report some investigations that I made in order to understand how the low blood sugar curve comes about.

Assuming that the symptoms of the idiopathic steatorrheas arise from some disturbance in absorption which applies chiefly to the alimentary fats but perhaps also, in lesser degree, to the proteins, one might imagine that the slight rise of the blood sugar curve after

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