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Article
November 1929

THE EFFECT OF MECHANICAL CONSTRICTION OF THE HEPATIC VEINS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE COAGULATION OF BLOOD

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1929;44(5):676-692. doi:10.1001/archinte.1929.00140050053005
Abstract

In 1925, in the laboratory of the department of pathology of the Northwestern University Medical School, a method was devised for blocking the outflow of blood from the liver by mechanical constriction of the hepatic veins in the dog.1 This procedure permits a temporary exclusion of the liver and splanchnic area from the general circulation and their return to it at will, and makes possible a study of some of the functions of the liver. It has advantages over the more drastic methods formerly employed of removing the liver entirely,2 or permanently shutting it out of the circulation by an Eck fistula.3 The trauma produced by mechanical constriction of the hepatic veins is less severe. It is, however, an acute experiment. It must be done under a general anesthetic, and observations must be made at short intervals during constriction, lasting from ten to forty-five minutes—that is, before the effects of

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