[Skip to Navigation]
[Skip to Navigation Landing]
Article
January 1930

HEMOCHROMATOSIS: REPORT OF A CASE, WITH STUDIES OF THE COPPER CONTENT OF THE LIVER

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Medical Service of Dr. Thomas McCrae and the Ayer Clinical Laboratory of the Pennsylvania Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(1):37-45. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140070044003
Abstract

In 1889, von Recklinghausen described a form of pigmentation affecting many organs of the body which he called hemochromatosis. This condition is often accompanied in its terminal stages by diabetes— the bronze diabetes of French writers. While the number of recorded cases (approximately a few over 100) would indicate that the condition is rare, various observers have pointed out that it may easily be overlooked clinically in the early stages when the skin pigmentation, glycosuria and the hemosiderin granules in the urine are absent. Mills1 reported that in seventeen pathologically advanced cases, only two were recognized during life and proved positive by the demonstration of hemosiderin in an excised piece of skin. Many patients, no doubt, die of intercurrent diseases before the positive clinical picture of hemochromatosis is established. Excellent pathologic and clinical studies are recorded in the literature. The characteristic pathologic picture is the presence of hemofuscin and hemosiderin

×