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Article
January 1930

EXOPHTHALMIC GOITER: THE PROTEIN CONTENT OF THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID

Author Affiliations

Henry P. Walcott Fellow in Clinical Medicine, Harvard Medical School; BOSTON

From the Metabolism and Neurological Laboratories of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(1):122-124. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140070129011
Abstract

One of us (W.O.T.) has previously shown that the concentration of protein in cerebrospinal fluid is high in most cases of myxedema, and usually drops to within normal limits following the administration of desiccated thyroid.1 Similar measurements2 have now been made in several cases of exophthalmic goiter before any treatment was started and after the body weight had reached a stationary level following a subtotal thyroidectomy. The observations are the opposite of those in myxedema. Before treatment, the concentration of protein is usually within the lower limits of normal.3 It shows a well marked increase (eleven out of fifteen cases) in association with a gain in body weight and a reduction in basal metabolism after operation. This is illustrated in fifteen unselected cases in the accompanying table and illustration. It may be noted that, as usual, there are wide individual variations in protein concentration. Our experience has been, however, that

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