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Article
February 1930

TWENTY-FOUR HOUR BLOOD SUGAR VARIATIONS IN FASTING AND IN NONFASTING SUBJECTS

Author Affiliations

DALLAS, TEXAS

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(2):257-260. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140080099007
Abstract

As the response of the diabetic patients to food is the same as that of the normal person save for the varying degrees of deficiency of endogenous insulin, it was thought that the knowledge of normal fluctuations of the blood sugar over a period of twenty-four hours might prove of value in the management of diabetic cases. There have appeared in the literature studies of blood sugar variations in diabetic and in nondiabetic persons. From these studies suggestions have been offered to facilitate the handling of diabetes as regards the time insulin should be given, the dosage, etc. Jonas and his associates1 studied all day blood sugar curves in diabetic and nondiabetic persons. They found from their observations that mild cases of diabetes may be controlled by a single morning dose of insulin, owing to the tendency of the blood sugar to be rising or to rise higher after this

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