[Skip to Navigation]
[Skip to Navigation Landing]
Article
February 1930

THE RANGE OF EFFECTIVE IODINE DOSAGE IN EXOPHTHALMIC GOITER: I. THE EFFECT ON BASAL METABOLISM OF REST AND OF THE DAILY ADMINISTRATION OF ONE DROP OF COMPOUND SOLUTION OF IODINE

Author Affiliations

Henry P. Walcott Fellow in Clinical Medicine, Harvard Medical School; BOSTON

From the Metabolism Laboratory and Thyroid Clinic of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(2):261-281. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140080103008
Abstract

The normal daily requirement of the body for iodine has never been determined. Indirect evidence on the question is offered by analyses for iodine of soil, water, air and various foodstuffs as they occur in different parts of the world.1 The foods richest in iodine are certain sea foods, but even these contain only from 0.07 to 2.4 mg. per kilogram, and most foods in the average dietary contain much less. McClendon and Williams2 found that even in those districts of the United States in which the drinking water is relatively rich in iodine, it would be necessary to drink 10 liters of water daily in order to take in 0.10 mg. of the element by this means.

McClendon and Hathaway3 and von Fellenberg4 have made valuable measurements of the ingestion and excretion of iodine in normal persons. The first observers, in a three day study of a normal subject,

×