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Article
March 1930

THE RELATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION AND STRUCTURE OF THE CORONARY ARTERIES TO MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Medicine, Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(3):383-400. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140090066003
Abstract

A description of the usual course of the coronary arteries and of their more common variations is necessary for the present study. As a detailed account of the finer branches of the coronary arteries is of no particular value in understanding the present work, an elaborate description of the vessels will not be presented, and an account of the auricular circulation will be omitted entirely.

THE USUAL DISTRIBUTION AND THE MORE COMMON VARIATIONS OF THE BLOOD VESSELS SUPPLYING THE VENTRICLES 

The Typical Course of the Coronary Arteries.  —Both coronary arteries arise from the aorta close to its juncture with the ventricle. The right coronary artery originates from the anterior sinus of Valsalva, and passes to the coronary sulcus. It follows along this groove at the juncture of the right auricle and the right ventricle, and gives off branches to the anterior surface of the right ventricle. One or two of

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