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Article
March 1930

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC OF 1928A STUDY OF ITS BACTERIOLOGY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the John McCormick Institute for Infectious Diseases.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(3):412-419. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140090095005
Abstract

The conflicting opinions concerning the specific cause of the epidemic of influenza in 1918 make a study of the epidemic of 1928 of added importance. In the recent epidemic, though obviously less severe than that of 1918, the condition resembled closely the milder infections of the previous epidemic. The principal reports of the bacteriologic observations of the 1918 epidemic center around: (1) the influenza bacillus, (2) Bacterium pneumosintes and (3) a specific streptococcus. Mathers, Tunnicliff,1 Jordan,2 Rosenow3 and others described a green-producing streptococcus growing characteristically as large, flat, moist colonies on blood agar plates. It was usually capsulated and lanceolate. It was ordinarily not dissolved by bile and did not ferment inulin. Agglutination and absorption experiments indicated a close immunologic alliance of the majority of the strains. Agglutinins, of low titer, were reported in the serum of patients. Tunnicliff demonstrated the development of specific opsonins during the course of the

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