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Article
April 1930

THE BLOOD IN LIPOID NEPHROSIS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE ABSENCE OF ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(4):611-623. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140100133012
Abstract

The most striking feature in lipoid nephrosis, aside from the edema, is the patient's pallor, which suggests the presence of considerable anemia. Examination of the blood, however, often shows that the erythrocytes and the hemoglobin are normal. For this reason, statistical data on this point were assembled. It is well known that in another form of renal disease, chronic glomerular nephritis, secondary anemia is frequently a prominent feature; in fact, this has been shown to be of accurate prognostic value.

It is generally accepted that pure lipoid nephrosis is a definite clinical entity, although it occurs rarely. It is much more common to observe cases of diffuse nephritis in which the nephrotic or tubular element is predominant. Müller2 introduced the term "nephrosis" in 1905 as representing a degenerative renal lesion, in contradistinction to nephritis, in which there is an infectious and usually a glomerular process. However, Aschoff3 and others believed

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