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Article
May 1930

EFFECT OF TONSILLECTOMY ON THE ACUTE ATTACK OF RHEUMATIC FEVER: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Second Medical Service, Boston City Hospital, and the Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(5):772-782. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140110128011
Abstract

For a number of years the tonsils have been considered by many as an important focus in the persistence of rheumatic infections. It is likewise a well recognized fact among clinicians that acute attacks of rheumatic fever and recurrences of these attacks are frequently ushered in by acute infections of the tonsils. Tonsillectomy is therefore frequently recommended to the sufferers from this disease with the hope of preventing these recurrences. For the same reason we have for a number of years recommended enucleation of the tonsils during the acute attack of rheumatic fever in an attempt to determine whether or not a persistent infection could not be curtailed by removing this focus. We wish here to present briefly some of the results of our experience with this procedure over a period of five years.

In order to evaluate the effect of tonsillectomy as a therapeutic agent in the control of

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