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Article
June 1930

LYMPHOSARCOMA: WITH INVOLVEMENT OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; DETROIT

From the Neuropathological Laboratory, Montefiore Hospital, New York.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;45(6):908-925. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140120083004
Abstract

The brain and spinal cord are rarely the seat of direct invasion by lymphosarcomatous masses. Occasionally the structures about the central nervous system, such as the bones of the skull or the vertebrae, may show the presence of lymphosarcomatous nodules. Ewing1 mentioned that with involvement of the cervical lymph nodes, the lesion may invade the wall of the pharynx, the tonsils and the base of the skull. Murchison,2 in 1870, described a case in which a small growth existed in the dura mater above the foramen magnum, and Mosler,3 in 1872, found in another case some small lymphoid tumors above the optic foramen. Roncalli,4 in 1894, reported a case of lymphosarcoma with erosion of the base and dura. Guillain, Alajouanine and Perisson5 claimed to be the first to report lymphosarcomatous involvement of the spinal cord. The extramedullary masses found at operation compressed the cord, causing a complete paraplegia. Elsberg,6 in

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