[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1930

SO-CALLED MALIGNANT HYPERTENSION: A CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

MILWAUKEE

From the Medical Clinic and Laboratories of the Milwaukee County Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Marquette University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(1):75-104. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140130078007
Abstract

Recent work in America and abroad has emphasized the importance of a group of rapidly fatal cases associated with excessive hypertension. Among the various terms that have been employed to define this condition those most commonly used are "malignant hypertension," "malignant renal sclerosis of Fahr," "genuine contracted kidney" and "chronic interstitial nephritis."

The term "malignant hypertension" was first used by Volhard and Fahr1 to designate cases of renal arteriosclerosis in which renal failure later developed. They assumed that the condition was caused by the addition of an inflammatory process to a kidney already damaged by arteriosclerosis, leading to infarction and necrosis of the glomerular loops. Fahr2 later introduced the anatomic expression "malignant renal sclerosis" to designate changes in the kidney characterized by necrosis of the afferent glomerular arterioles and the capillary loops, with inflammatory changes in the corresponding glomerulus.

Keith, Wagener and Kernohan3 employed the term "malignant hypertension" in a

×