[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1930

ADDISON'S DISEASE IN A NEGROREPORT OF A CASE

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(3):375-381. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140150016002
Abstract

Addison's disease, contrary to the opinion of Addison himself, who felt that its recognition would show it of rather frequent occurrence, is relatively infrequent. Among white people in whom pigmentary changes lead to a diagnosis or suspicion of the disease with some ease, estimations of the frequency vary. Osler1 stated that he saw only seventeen cases in the United States in twenty-one years. In 1925, Rowntree2 was able to collect forty-seven cases (16 per hundred thousand cases registered) from the Mayo Clinic records of the preceding thirteen years.

Because of the difficulties of recognizing the disease in Negroes attendant on their color, the diagnosis of Addison's disease is apparently rarely suspected and still more infrequently made and confirmed. In a careful search of the literature for the last forty years, we have been able to find but four recorded cases, only two of which came to autopsy. We record a

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×