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Article
September 1930

PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: BLOOD REGENERATION DURING EARLY REMISSION

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Thomas Henry Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(3):417-439. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140150058006
Abstract

The use of liver in pernicious anemia, following the discovery of its therapeutic value by Minot and Murphy,1 has greatly increased the knowledge on the nature of blood regeneration during remission in this disease. The contributions to this subject of Peabody2 and of Minot, Murphy, Cohn and their associates3 have been particularly valuable. According to their observations, the fundamental defect in hematopoiesis during a relapse in pernicious anemia depends on the inability of the primitive red blood cells of bone-marrow to differentiate normally to their adult state. As a result, the hematopoietic tissue of bonemarrow becomes hyperplastic and crowded with megaloblasts. The regenerative activity of bone-marrow being restricted in this fashion, the numbers of red blood cells in the peripheral blood decrease, and many of those present are abnormal. The liver,4 kidneys5 and stomach6 contain a substance which appears to stimulate the maturation of the primitive red blood cells and

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