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Article
September 1930

RED BLOOD CELL SIZE IN ANEMIA: ITS VALUE IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Wards of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(3):440-457. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140150081007
Abstract

A knowledge of the relative size of the red blood cells may be of definite value in differentiating between the types of anemia. This information may be obtained by a careful study of the red blood cells in a stained smear made from the patient's blood. Determinations of the mean diameter of the red blood cells by actual measurement of a number of cells, as suggested by Price-Jones,1 or by a modification of this method, have been made use of frequently; but this method is rather too time-consuming to be used extensively. Pijper2 and others have suggested a diffraction method for determining the size of the red blood cells. Haden3 suggested the determination of the volume of the average red blood cell by means of a simple calculation based on a knowledge of the red blood cell count and the total percentage volume of cells as determined by means of

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