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Article
November 1930

ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION TEST IN TUBERCULOSIS: A STUDY OF TWO THOUSAND CASES

Author Affiliations

WAUWATOSA, WIS.

From Muirdale Sanatorium.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1930;46(5):787-796. doi:10.1001/archinte.1930.00140170048006
Abstract

The recent medical literature contains numerous reports dealing with the clinical application of the erythrocyte sedimentation test, an excellent review of which may be found in a valuable study of Peterman.1 The conclusions drawn from these works concerning its specificity, reliability and usefulness in the diagnosis and prognosis of tuberculosis are far from being unanimous. For this reason we feel that the information derived from the study of this test in 2,000 consecutive cases at Muirdale Sanatorium might be worth recording.

The phenomenon that red blood cells suspended in solutions of anticoagulants, such as sodium citrate, potassium oxalate, hirudin or heparin. settle down with increasing rapidity in a great many pathologic conditions has been utilized in the recognition of certain diseases since 1897. The efforts of Fahraeus to detect pregnancy by means of the sedimentation test in 1918 were followed by reports from practically all branches of medicine.

Among the

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