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Article
March 1931

CUTANEOUS REACTIONS TO HISTAMINE: REACTIONS IN OCCLUSIVE AND SPASTIC VASCULAR DISEASE AND IN CHRONIC INFECTIOUS ARTHRITIS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;47(3):403-407. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00140210066006
Abstract

The characteristic cutaneous reaction to histamine was described by Eppinger1 and by Sollmann and Pilcher.2 A small area of the skin is cleansed with alcohol and is allowed to dry. A drop of 1 : 1,000 solution of histamine acid phosphate is placed thereon and is introduced intradermally by pricking with a fine needle. The excess histamine is gently wiped away with a piece of gauze. The reaction is characterized by a triple response, namely: (1) a reddish-purple spot due to local capillary dilatation; (2) a local wheal, due to transudation of serum from the capillaries by reason of increased permeability, and (3) a flare due to dilatation of the arterioles by the reflex of a local axon.

Dale and Richards3 showed that the presence of small amounts of epinephrine and oxygen are necessary for the characteristic action of histamine to take place. Krogh4 expressed the belief that unknown factors

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