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Article
March 1931

THE TREATMENT OF RESPIRATORY ARREST IN THE DRINKER RESPIRATORA CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;47(3):424-435. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00140210087009
Abstract

Failure of respiration is a decisive occurrence that must be met at once by substitution of mechanically induced breathing. It is so critical an emergency, so desperately certain to be fatal, that appliances and methods for artificial respiration have even been granted a certain margin of danger if they, in the main, promised to perform well. In his review of the history of artificial respiration, Keith1 described the development of bellows appliances for resuscitation as early as 1732. Such devices were given much attention, and were not discarded for use by the Royal Humane Society until 1837. Their rejection resulted from the large amount of harm that it was shown they might produce. The lungmotor and the pulmotor, modern appliances very similar to the bellows devices of a hundred years ago, have had an identical history. The introduction of carbon dioxide as a stimulant for breathing in asphyxia in 1922

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