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Article
March 1931

CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE: MEASUREMENTS OF THE CIRCULATION

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1931;47(3):484-499. doi:10.1001/archinte.1931.00140210147012
Abstract

CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL DATA  The cyanosis of congenital heart disease is usually associated with a considerable degree of unsaturation of the arterial blood. In these cases, as noted by Lundsgaard and Van Slyke,1 either (a) the blood that passes through the lungs is insufficiently saturated with oxygen, owing to some pulmonary defect, or (b) there is a shunting of some venous blood from the right side of the heart into the systemic aorta without its having passed through the pulmonary alveoli.Some years ago Haldane and Douglas2 placed a patient with cyanotic congenital heart disease in an atmosphere high in oxygen and noted that the cyanosis did not clear; they inferred that the defective aeration of the blood was not due to pulmonary insufficiency. On the other hand, Campbell, Hunt and Poulton3 tried the same procedure with one of their patients having congenital heart disease, and found that the arterial

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