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Article
January 1932

SEVERE RENAL INSUFFICIENCY: UNTOWARD EFFECTS OF INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF SOLUTION OF SODIUM CHLORIDE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Division of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(1):165-170. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150080168011
Abstract

Two cases are reported herewith of marked renal insufficiency with azotemia and without edema in which the administration intravenously of sodium chloride appeared to produce untoward effects. When the patients came under our observation, it was clearly indicated that if there was anything to be accomplished, it must be done by the intravenous administration of fluids. So far as was known, there were no definite contraindications to administering sodium chloride other than a suspicion that it might do harm. In these cases, the observations were not planned, but they were controlled accurately enough to permit of interpretation.

REPORT OF CASES  Case 1.—A woman, aged 28, a teacher, came to the clinic in September, 1929, complaining of headaches and vomiting. She had enjoyed good health until five months before admission, when she began to have frontal headaches which came on while she was at work. Soon these headaches were accompanied by

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