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Article
February 1932

PSITTACOSIS: WITH RESULTS OF POSTMORTEM EXAMINATION IN A CASE INCLUDING STUDIES OF THE SPINAL CORD

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the Department of Pathology, the Jewish Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(2):253-269. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150090083010
Abstract

The following case is reported, firstly, because, as far as could be ascertained, it is the first case of psittacosis in New York City in which the diagnosis was confirmed both by bacteriologic and by postmortem examination, and secondly, because the case permitted of studies on the changes in the spinal cord.

REPORT OF CASE  B. H., aged 51, a white woman, Jewish, a housewife, was admitted to the Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn to the private service of Dr. Meyer Rabinowitz on Feb. 5, 1931. The chief complaints were chills and fever for the last two days and pain in the back for the last four days.

Present Illness.  —About a week before admission the patient was seized with intermittent chills. A physician was called and diagnosed her condition as "grip." The following day the patient felt improved, but three days later she developed signs of pneumonia and was taken

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