[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.194.190. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1932

THE EFFECT OF NITRITES ON THE MOTILITY OF THE GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT: II. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Medicine and the Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Western Reserve University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(2):276-281. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150090106012
Abstract

Amyl nitrite has been used extensively in the treatment for angina pectoris and hypertension since its introduction by Lauder Brunton in 1867. Numerous observations, both clinical and experimental, have been made on the action of nitrites on the circulatory system, but very little attention has been directed toward other possible actions of these compounds. The only clinical observations made on the action of the nitrites on the gastro-intestinal tract are those of Reigel and Frank, Pal, and Holmes and Dresser, already referred to in a previous paper.1 The only experimental work is that of Hirschfelder, who found that nitrites caused cessation of peristalsis in rabbits and cats suffering from experimental lead colic, and who also showed that this action was not vascular in origin but probably a direct action on the intestines.

In a clinical study of the effect of nitrites on the gastro-intestinal tract, it has been found that

×