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Article
March 1932

THE SYSTEMIC EFFECTS OF HISTAMINE IN MAN: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE RESPONSES OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard) of the Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine of Harvard Medical School.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(3):360-396. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150100017002
Abstract

The concept that histamine plays a fundamental rôle in the chemical control of the circulation is suggested by a series of observations by Dale and Lewis and their associates.1 It is, however, remarkable that the evidence concerning histamine as a vasodilator substance in the physiologic regulation of the circulation is still largely based on indirect evidence and analogical observations. Direct proof for this function of histamine in the animal body is so far not available, and while the value of parallel and "teleologic evidence" in establishing a physiologic concept is considerable, it is recognized that concepts based on indirect evidence may be open to fallacy and therefore cannot be considered as proved.

Burn and Dale and their associates2 observed a fall in the arterial blood pressure in anesthetized carnivorous animals. Lewis and his associates3 presented evidence that the human skin, when subjected to various sorts of stimuli,

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