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Article
May 1932

PAIN IN MUSCULAR ISCHEMIA: ITS RELATION TO ANGINAL PAIN

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(5):713-727. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150120003001
Abstract

The term angina pectoris is usually and properly used to indicate the disease as it was described by Heberden and his contemporaries. It is not with the general pathology of this disease that I propose to deal, but rather with one problem related to it, namely, the origin of the pain that characterizes the attacks that render this malady so distressing. There is perhaps no symptom familiar to clinicians that has given rise to more speculation than that of anginal pain. The theories that have been put forward to explain it are too numerous to pass even in review; such a review will not be attempted, but the problem will be approached from a special angle that is relevant to the new observations to be described.

The idea that angina pectoris can arise out of a morbid change in the coronary vessels came, as Parry1 has said, from Edward

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