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Article
May 1932

DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILITIC AORTITIS UNCOMPLICATED BY AORTIC REGURGITATION OR ANEURYSM: COMPARISON OF CLINICAL AND NECROPSY OBSERVATIONS IN ONE HUNDRED AND FIVE PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE; KANSAS CITY, MO.; WASHINGTON, D. C.

From the Syphilis Division of the Medical Clinic, the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(5):753-766. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150120043005
Abstract

The early diagnosis of syphilitic aortitis, before the development of aortic regurgitation or aneurysm, is a question of fundamental importance in the treatment of cardiovascular syphilis. When the aortic valves have been so distorted as to produce incompetency or when the wall of the aorta has weakened to the point of producing saccular dilatation, the utmost to be expected of treatment is some degree of symptomatic relief and the possible prolongation of life to more than the usual span of about two years from the appearance of symptoms.1 If, however, involvement of the aorta can be recognized before these anatomic disasters have occurred and if appropriate treatment is instituted, it is reasonable to hope for symptomatic relief in a higher proportion of cases and prolongation of useful life for a much longer period of time.

That the problem is deserving of careful study is indicated by the gradually increasing

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