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Article
May 1932

CHRONIC GASTRIC ULCERS: HISTOLOGIC OBSERVATIONS ON THE FACTORS UNDERLYING THE HEALING OF LESIONS PRODUCED EXPERIMENTALLY IN RABBITS

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Anatomy, Northwestern University Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(5):846-859. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150120136013
Abstract

In 1928, I reported cytologic observations on the regenerative phenomena that followed the surgical removal of large areas of gastric mucosa in the dog.1 These areas represented experimental acute gastric ulcers. Such acute lesions healed rapidly, and the process was followed from the earliest changes to complete restoration with newly differentiated epithelium. The type of cell responsible for regeneration of this epithelium was identified and was found to be the so-called foveolar cell which forms the foveolae of normal gastric glands.

Similar work was attempted in the rabbit, but it was evident that, with the technic employed, the process in this animal was somewhat different from that observed in the dog. The acute lesions in the rabbit instead of healing tended to become chronic ulcers in a large percentage of the experiments. Reports on a few of these ulcers were included in my previous article. The successful production of

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