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Article
June 1932

THIOCYANATE THERAPY IN HYPERTENSION: II. ITS EFFECT ON BLOOD PRESSURE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Medicine, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York University, and the Third (New York University) Medicine Division of Bellevue Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;49(6):934-945. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150130057003
Abstract

The reintroduction of thiocyanate in the treatment for arterial hypertension has, in recent years, attracted wide attention. A number of investigators have attested to its effectiveness in lowering both normal and abnormally elevated blood pressures.1 On the other hand, it has been stated that in a large group, thiocyanate appears to exert no more beneficial effect on hypertension than do certain so-called nonspecific measures of therapy, classed under the general heading of "psychic and sedative treatment."2 We have shown in a previous study3 that thiocyanate administered in the dosage frequently recommended may be accompanied by serious toxic manifestations and even death. Furthermore, the great tendency toward variability of raised blood pressures4 and the not infrequent spontaneous remissions observed in the course of essential hypertension5 often render the true interpretation of any so-called therapeutic endeavor particularly hazardous. It therefore seemed advisable to us that another series

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