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Article
July 1932

TOXICITY OF MERSALYL (SALYRGAN): A CLINICAL AND ANATOMIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Medical Service and the Laboratory Division, Montefiore Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(1):158-166. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150140165011
Abstract

Despite the widespread use of the newer mercurial diuretics, merbaphen (novasurol) and mersalyl (salyrgan), there still exists some doubt as to their ultimate harmlessness. Stomatitis, colitis, proctitis, purpura, hematuria and even death have been reported following the use of novasurol. With the introduction of salyrgan there was noted a decrease in the severity and number of the reations.1

In his experiences with both drugs, Petzal2 called attention to the change. In several hundred injections of salyrgan he saw no toxic manifestations. At necropsy Agnew3 observed hemorrhagic colitis in eight subjects following the use of novasurol, but no such manifestation occurred after the injection of salyrgan, despite its more extensive use at that time (1926). Bernheim4 recorded the administration of 1,000 injections of salyrgan without complicating reactions. Tscherning5 warned against the active use of the drug in aged men with complicating prostatic hypertrophy. In four of

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