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Article
August 1932

INFLUENCE ON CARBOHYDRATE METABOLISM OF EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED HEPATIC CHANGES: III. CHLOROFORM POISONING

Author Affiliations

Fellow of the J. Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, from the Department of Medicine, University of California Medical School SAN FRANCISCO; LEIPZIG, GERMANY

From the Medizinische Universitätsklinik, Leipzig, Prof. Dr. Morawitz, Director.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(2):257-268. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150150089009
Abstract

Chloroform, according to Mosiman and Whipple,1 affects mainly the nuclei of hepatic cells. As described by Whipple and Sperry,2 it produces hyaline necrosis which is of a strictly central distribution, widening out concentrically as the dose of the poison is increased. Chloroform can also produce moderate fatty degeneration in other organs. Occasionally, severe necrosis of the kidney tubules may follow the administration of chloroform, even leading to delayed death of the animal. Williamson and Mann,3 Opie and Alford,4 and Mosiman and Whipple all came to the conclusion that the liver is the only organ that is seriously injured by the administration of chloroform.

METHOD  Chloroform was administered subcutaneously in single doses as a 33 per cent solution in oil to fourteen rabbits. Rabbit 739 was given 0.5 cc. of chloroform per kilogram of body weight and rabbit 717, 0.75 cc.; the rest received 1 cc. per

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