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Article
August 1932

TREATMENT OF LOBAR PNEUMONIA WITH CARBON DIOXIDE AND OXYGEN: REPORT OF TWENTY-SEVEN CASES

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

From the Department of Medicine, Emory University Medical School, and the Emory Division of Grady Hospital.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(2):269-275. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150150101010
Abstract

Pneumonia has challenged man's therapeutic skill for centuries. Hippocrates and other members of the Greek school recognized the disease with its high mortality. Though progress has been made in the knowledge of the clinical features, morbid anatomy and bacteriology of the disease, the death rate remains essentially unchanged, and pneumonia is still one of the most widespread and fatal of all acute diseases.

Various forms of therapy have been heralded, each with claims of reduction in mortality. Chemotherapy, with the use of ethylhydrocupreine and of mercurochrome-220 soluble, has been tried. Vaccines have been used extensively. The greatest therapeutic triumph in pneumonia has been the development of specific immunizing serum. The work of Cole and Moore1 in developing a specific serum for pneumococci of type I and that of Felton2 in producing a concentrated serum for pneumococci of types I and II have added to the progress of medicine.

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