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Article
September 1932

UREA CLEARANCE TEST AS AN INDEX OF RENAL FUNCTION: I. STUDIES OF NORMAL SUBJECTS

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(3):351-357. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150160002001
Abstract

In 1921, Austin, Stillman and Van Slyke,1 while developing the urea secretory constant, discovered two laws of urea excretion. They found that the normal rate of urea excretion in man and dog increases, first, in direct proportion to the blood urea concentration, and second, in proportion to the square root of the urinary volume per unit of body weight. They also showed that a rising volume of urine is not indefinitely accompanied by an increase in the output of urea. The point at which an acceleration of the urinary flow is not paralleled by further elimination of urea they termed the "augmentation limit," and placed it between 2.5 and 6 liters of urine per twenty-four hours in normal persons, that is, from 1.7 to 4.1 cc. per minute.

These original concepts were verified in 1928 by Möller, McIntosh and Van Slyke,2 who in a study of seven normal

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