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Article
September 1932

UNDULANT FEVER: AN EPIDEMIC OF SUBCLINICAL INFECTION WITH BRUCELLA

Author Affiliations

KENT, CONN.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(3):373-379. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150160024004
Abstract

In recent years, so much has been written about infection with Brucella that it seems advisable to limit this report to the briefest and most objective description of my own experience. For excellent reviews, with bibliographies, the reader is referred to the publications of Hardy1 and of Löffler,2 and to the report of the League of Nations.3

The persons dealt with in this study were the pupils, masters and employees in a boys' boarding school in a rural region of Connecticut, where I have been in continuous resident attendance for the past three years. Excellent hospital equipment, with adequate nursing care, and laboratory facilities, with technical assistance, are an integral part of the school. Individual medical records with notation of every complaint, however trivial, are carefully kept. During the winter term, each boy is briefly examined every day, and during the rest of the school year frequent

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