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Article
October 1932

SEDIMENTATION TEST AS A ROUTINE LABORATORY PROCEDURE: OBSERVATIONS ON ELEVEN HUNDRED PERSONS

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS

From the Department of Pathology, Tulane University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(4):569-573. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150170061005
Abstract

In 1918 Fahraeus,1 in Germany, demonstrated the clinical importance of variable accelerated sedimentation of the erythrocytes in different conditions of disease. Westergreen,2 also in Germany, carried out excellent work in this line; however, his technic is more elaborate and difficult, and his observations were chiefly on the sedimentation of red blood cells in tuberculosis. In America, Polak3 is the most outspoken advocate of the sedimentation test. From its application in gynecologic conditions, he believes that this test offers another aid in the diagnosis of an infection which when frequently repeated and correlated with the clinical history, temperature curve and white blood cell changes forms a valuable index as to the time at which to operate and is also of prognostic value.

To explain the differences in speed of erythrocytic sedimentation, Fischl4 and Schmitz5 held that it is due to an alteration of the albuminglobulin ratio

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