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Article
October 1932

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES IN GASTRIC PHYSIOLOGY: EVALUATION OF THE RÔLE OF DUODENAL REGURGITATION IN THE CONTROL OF GASTRIC ACIDITY IN MAN (BOLDYREFF THEORY)

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Gastro-Intestinal Clinic of the Jewish Hospital, Philadelphia.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(4):605-620. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150170097010
Abstract

Since Heidenhain's1 observation that the pure gastric juice in the normal dog was secreted at an acidity of 0.5 to 0.6 per cent hydrochloric acid, and particularly since its confirmation in human beings by Carlson,2 physiologists have puzzled over the mechanism involved in the reduction of this high acidity to the one ordinarily seen in gastric contents. In general, the many theories evolved to explain the reduction concern themselves with one or the other of two mechanisms: (1) neutralization and (2) dilution. Babkin3 recently gave an excellent résumé of this subject. It is our intention to inquire into only one of these theories, the one that has doubtless enjoyed the greatest popularity. This is the theory developed by Boldyreff and styled by him "the self-regulation of gastric acidity." Briefly, it contends that the small intestine cannot tolerate an acid stronger than from 0.1 to 0.15 per cent

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