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Article
December 1932

ENDEMIC NUTRITIONAL EDEMA: I. CLINICAL FINDINGS AND DIETARY STUDIES

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(6):843-854. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150190045005
Abstract

The association of edema and starvation, particularly in epidemics, has been recognized for centuries. The commoner causes of the undernutrition are reflected in the terms "famine edema," "war edema," "prison edema," etc., which have been applied to this condition. During the World War edema attracted a great deal of attention, especially in Germany and the Central Powers where the reduction in food supplies made it extremely common. Still more recently it has been studied and reported among the population of certain famine districts in China.1 The German studies, especially those of Schittenhelm and Schlecht,2 Jansen,3 Schittenhelm4 and Knack and Neumann,5 are of special interest, since it was shown that this type of edema was associated with a hypoproteinemia, owing presumably to an insufficient supply of protein in the diet. Since then other studies have shown that cases not only of war edema but of other types of

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