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Article
December 1932

CHEMISTRY AND METABOLISM IN EXPERIMENTAL YELLOW FEVER IN MACACUS RHESUS MONKEYS: VI. THE BROMSULPHALEIN LIVER FUNCTION TEST AND THE VAN DEN BERGH REACTION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the laboratory of the West African Yellow Fever Commission of the International Health Division, Rockefeller Foundation, Lagos, Nigeria.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1932;50(6):876-883. doi:10.1001/archinte.1932.00150190078007
Abstract

In previous articles1 it has been shown that there is a definite decline in hepatic function during the course of yellow fever. This loss of function makes itself evident about twenty-four hours before death (in some cases earlier), through alterations in the fasting blood sugar and in the blood sugar curves following the injection of dextrose. In the later stages of the disease, usually during the last ten or twelve hours before death, there are marked changes in the nitrogen metabolism and in some of the mineral elements of the blood and the urine.

In this paper are presented the results of further tests for hepatic function: (1) the bromsulphalein liver function test, (2) determination of the bilirubin content of blood by the van den Bergh reaction and (3) a number of examinations made for fibrin and the coagulation time of the blood. The bromsulphalein liver function test was

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