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Article
January 1933

SYNDROME OF ANEMIA, GLOSSITIS AND DYSPHAGIA: REPORT OF EIGHT CASES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO OBSERVATIONS AT AUTOPSY IN ONE INSTANCE

Author Affiliations

Medical Research Fellow, Rockefeller Foundation; Research Fellow in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School LONDON, ENGLAND

From the Medical Services of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1933;51(1):1-21. doi:10.1001/archinte.1933.00150200004001
Abstract

The association of dysphagia, superficial glossitis and anemia has been noted sufficiently frequently during the past few years to have become regarded as a clinical entity, and has often been referred to as the "Plummer-Vinson syndrome." Since none of the many hypotheses concerning the nature of this condition appears to have been based on histopathologic data, it was thought that a report of the observations at autopsy in one instance might prove of value. In addition, a review of the literature and the clinical findings in eight cases of this syndrome are presented.

The syndrome was first pointed out independently by Brown Kelly1 and by D. R. Paterson2 at the summer congress of the Laryngological Section of the Royal Society of Medicine in London, May 2, 1919, with papers entitled, respectively, "Spasm at the Entrance of the Oesophagus" and "A Clinical Type of Dysphagia."

The condition, as described

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