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Article
July 1933

INFLUENCE OF SCLEROTIC ARTERIAL WALL ON BLOOD PRESSURE MEASUREMENTSREPORT OF CASE WITH CALCIFICATION OF ONE RADIAL ARTERY

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1933;52(1):33-43. doi:10.1001/archinte.1933.00160010040004
Abstract

Many studies have been made to determine whether a markedly sclerotic artery requires considerably more pressure to obliterate its lumen than a normal soft artery. The results of these investigations, largely derived from studies made directly on excised arteries, support the view that the pressure of but a few more millimeters of mercury is required to obliterate the lumen of a calcified artery. These findings apparently have not been verified in the living person. A person who had a markedly sclerotic radial artery in one arm and a soft radial artery in the other arm would offer an opportunity for an answer to this question by a comparison of simultaneous readings of the blood pressure in both arms. We have recently observed such a person, and the results of studies on him are presented in this paper.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE  An excellent summary of the literature on this subject

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