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Article
January 1934

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGIC DIFFERENTIATION OF THE ACUTE LEUKEMIASWITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ACUTE MONOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;53(1):1-34. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160070004001
Abstract

Friedreich1 in 1857 reported a case of leukemia with an acute course. Ebstein2 in 1889 described the clinical picture of acute leukemia. Fraenkel3 in 1895 directed attention particularly to changes in the cells of the blood, and expressed the view that all acute leukemias were lymphogenous because of the similarity of the white blood cells of these patients to lymphocytes. Naegeli4 in 1900 described the myeloblast, thereby permitting, on the basis of the cytologic characteristics, the separation of two types of acute leukemia, myeloblastic or acute myelogenous and lymphoblastic or acute lymphatic. A sharp differentiation, however, was not always clear owing to difficulties in technic of staining blood smears and because of atypical cases which defied classification.

Further elucidation of the problem was forthcoming in the discovery by Reschad and Shilling-Torgau5 in 1913 of a third type of acute leukemia, acute monocytic leukemia. Although twenty

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