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Article
January 1934

MYASTHENIA GRAVIS: THE EFFECT OF TREATMENT WITH GLYCINE AND EPHEDRINE; THIRD REPORT

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Clinical Metabolism, the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Intern Med (Chic). 1934;53(1):39-45. doi:10.1001/archinte.1934.00160070044003
Abstract

It is unnecessary to review the history of the recognition of myasthenia gravis as a clinical syndrome or to enter into details concerning the symptoms, course and prognosis of the disease. The variations in intensity are well known, as are the inconstancy in the rapidity with which the characteristic symptoms of the disease progress, the frequency of the partial remissions during slow but certain progression to a fatal issue and the rarity of complete intermission or spontaneous cure. It may not be generally realized that the disease is by no means rare; that the early stages, sometimes lasting for years, are often overlooked, and that the condition is recognized only in the later stages, which are followed rather rapidly by death, hastened by inhalation pneumonia and inanition.

The etiology of myasthenia gravis is not known. The evidence, however, substantiates the idea that the weakness accompanying the disease is due to

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